Red White & Blue Challah for a Fourth of July Shabbat

 
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At the risk of being a total and complete DOWNER…I’d like to preface this post by saying that culinary experiments—while fun and exciting and spontaneous—are not always a good idea. Best to stick with what you know…at least if you’re about to serve a hungry crowd.

It’s just the truth.

SO SUE ME.

But!

Today, the day after the Fourth of July, I had the whole entire day free. No work, no alarm, nada. And I figured if there was ever a good time to do something really, really weird in the kitchen, this was it.

(Not that lack of time has ever stopped me before. Heh.).

Anyway, that’s when I thought up this red, white, and blue challah, and the rest is carb-loaded history.

YAY.

For this patriotic beauty, I used my fabulous Insta friend Leanne Shor’s challah recipe as a base (only a few minutes of kneading required, and absolutely no stand mixers or bread hooks or other fancy equipment needed!) and adapted step 3 slightly.

Here’s what I did when I got to that part: Before kneading the dough, I separated it into 3 parts; then, I left the first section “blank,” kneaded it, and set it aside into a lightly oiled bowl. Because I knew the next two colored sections would be a little more time-consuming, I also covered that section with plastic wrap to keep it from drying out while I worked on the others.

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To make the red section (which is slightly muted on purpose—I’m a fan of a more subtle color palette!), I mixed in a few drops of pure red food coloring and a few drops of neon pink from the McCormick neon mix. But you can really just opt for the usual red drops.

I didn’t use gloves and was totally fine—just rip off a small section of dough, place it over the liquid color, and “hide” the color within the challah before you begin kneading so that you don’t get your hands messy. (And if you do get a little messy, who cares!)

The same technique worked with the blue section, except I used blue coloring. Duh. For the color you see in my photos, I used the McCormick neon blue mixed with a bit of the neon purple.

You’ll find that it’s a little tough to mix in those colors…it takes a bit of elbow grease (I’d say ~10 minutes per section / ~20 minutes total!). But they do eventually mix together—promise!

Next year, the Fourth actually does fall on a Friday—so, while it’s a bit late for you guys to try this out in 2019, I’m hopeful someone will take a stab at it next year. Let me know if you do! And be sure to follow Leanne over on Insta—she’s the greatest and her recipes always, always go off without a hitch. (No pressure, Leanne.) xx

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